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Before singing “Kun Faya Kun,” singer Javed Ali performs “wuzu” while wearing prayer headgear.

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Kun Faya Kun, from Rockstar, is one of AR Rahman’s masterpieces. Singer Javed Ali, who sang the song, revealed that a prayer-like rite preceded the recording.

Javed Ali told The Music Podcast that Rahman’s query before recording Kun Faya Kun enhanced the experience. “I remember I was singing Kun Faya Kun, and I was just standing there, ready to record. He asked, ‘Have you done ‘wuzu’?’ He said, ‘Please do that first,’ so I did that sincerely. Even after doing ‘wuzu,’ I put on a cap, and that’s when I recorded the song,” said Javed.

A spiritual mood prevailed during the recording. The studio was dark, save for a candle. Javed said, “The entire studio was blacked out; we only had a candle light. It was just Irshad Saab (Kamil, lyricist), Rahman sir, and me—just the three of us—and we recorded the song. It felt like we were all praying, and people can feel that too when they listen to the song. Even now, when I perform the song on stage, I cover my head.”

Javed Ali said, “He gives a lot of freedom to his artists. If I have an input on a song, he really respects it. I have learned a lot of techniques from him. There is divine energy in his surrounding area.”

Javed Ali and AR Rahman initially collaborated on Jashn-e-Bahara in 2008’s Jodha Akbar. Javed thanked Rahman for their shared musical journey, especially Raanjhana’s Tum Tak. Javed previously told the Hindustan Times that he cut short his holiday to record the song with Rahman, highlighting their close relationship.

Due to Javed Ali and AR Rahman’s profound artistic connection, Kun Faya Kun’s recording became a spiritual experience of reverence and dedication.

Before singing “Kun Faya Kun,” singer Javed Ali performs “wuzu” while wearing prayer headgear.

AR Rahman requested it before recording the ‘Rockstar’ song.


Kun Faya Kun, from Rockstar, is one of AR Rahman’s masterpieces. Singer Javed Ali, who sang the song, revealed that a prayer-like rite preceded the recording.

Javed Ali told The Music Podcast that Rahman’s query before recording Kun Faya Kun enhanced the experience. “I remember I was singing Kun Faya Kun, and I was just standing there, ready to record. He asked, ‘Have you done ‘wuzu’?’ He said, ‘Please do that first,’ so I did that sincerely. Even after doing ‘wuzu,’ I put on a cap, and that’s when I recorded the song,” said Javed.

A spiritual mood prevailed during the recording. The studio was dark, save for a candle. Javed said, “The entire studio was blacked out; we only had a candle light. It was just Irshad Saab (Kamil, lyricist), Rahman sir, and me—just the three of us—and we recorded the song. It felt like we were all praying, and people can feel that too when they listen to the song. Even now, when I perform the song on stage, I cover my head.”

Javed Ali said, “He gives a lot of freedom to his artists. If I have an input on a song, he really respects it. I have learned a lot of techniques from him. There is divine energy in his surrounding area.”

Javed Ali and AR Rahman initially collaborated on Jashn-e-Bahara in 2008’s Jodha Akbar. Javed thanked Rahman for their shared musical journey, especially Raanjhana’s Tum Tak. Javed previously told the Hindustan Times that he cut short his holiday to record the song with Rahman, highlighting their close relationship.

Due to Javed Ali and AR Rahman’s profound artistic connection, Kun Faya Kun’s recording became a spiritual experience of reverence and dedication.